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Showing posts with the label 50s

Pete Seeger - Where Have All The Flowers Gone?

"Where Have All the Flowers Gone?" is a modern folk-style song. The melody and the first three verses were written by Pete Seeger in 1955. Additional verses were added in May 1960 by Joe Hickerson, who turned it into a circular song. The 1964 release of the song as a Columbia Records Hall of Fame series 45 single.

The Platters - Only You (And You Alone)

"Only You (And You Alone)" is a pop song composed by Buck Ram.[1] It was originally recorded by The Platters with lead vocals by Tony Williams in 1955. The song held strong in the number 1 position on the U.S. R & B charts for seven weeks, and hit number five on the Billboard Hot 100.

The Everly Brothers - Wake Up Little Susie

"Wake Up Little Susie" is a popular song written by Felice and Boudleaux Bryant and published in 1957. The song is best known in a recording by the Everly Brothers, that reached No. 1 on the Billboard Pop chart and the Cash Box Best Selling Records chart.

Bill Haley and His Comets - Crazy Man Crazy

"Crazy Man, Crazy" was the title of an early rock and roll song written by, and first recorded by Bill Haley & His Comets in April 1953. peaking at #12 on the Billboard Juke Box chart for the week ending June 20, 1953, and #11 for two weeks on the Cash Box chart beginning for the week of June 13.

Jerry Lee Lewis — Great Balls Of Fire

"Great Balls of Fire" is a 1957 popular song recorded by Jerry Lee Lewis on Sun Records and featured in the 1957 movie Jamboree. The song sold one million copies in its first 10 days of release in the United States and sold over five million copies, making it both one of the best-selling singles in the United States, as well as one of the world's best-selling singles of all time. It reached No. 2 on the Billboard pop charts, No. 3 on the R&B charts, and No. 1 on the country charts. It also reached No. 1 on the UK Singles Chart.

Tommy Edwards - It's All In the Game

"It's All in the Game" is a pop song whose most successful version was recorded by Tommy Edwards in 1958. Carl Sigman composed the lyrics in 1951 to a wordless 1911 composition titled "Melody in A Major", written by Charles G. Dawes, who was later Vice President of the United States under Calvin Coolidge. It is the only No. 1 single in the U.S. to have been co-written by a U.S. Vice President or a Nobel Peace Prize laureate (Dawes was both).

Danny & The Juniors - At The Hop

"At the Hop" is a 50s pop song written by Artie Singer, John Medora, and David White and originally released by Danny & the Juniors. The song was released in the fall of 1957 and reached number one on the US charts on January 6, 1958, becoming one of the top-selling singles of 1958.

The Monotones - Book Of Love

"The Book of Love" (also titled "(Who Wrote) The Book of Love") is a rock and roll / doo-wop song, originally by The Monotones. In September 1957, the Monotones recorded "The Book of Love", which was released on the Mascot label in December that year. On the Billboard charts, "The Book of Love" peaked at No. 5 on the pop chart and No. 3 on the R&B chart.

Larry Williams - Bony Moronie

"Bony Moronie" was the third single by Larry Williams, released in 1957. Williams' original peaked at #14 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and #4 on the U.S. R&B chart.

Earth Angel (Will You Be Mine) - The Penguins

"Earth Angel", occasionally referred to as "Earth Angel (Will You Be Mine)", is a song by American doo-wop group the Penguins. it was released as their debut single in October 1954 on Dootone Records. "Earth Angel" became the first independent label release to appear on Billboard's national pop charts, where it peaked within the top 10. The song made an appearance in the movie Back to the Future.

Dinah Washington - Am I Asking Too Much

"Am I Asking Too Much" is a song by the American jazz singer Dinah Washington, part of her first album "Love is", released in 1957 via Mercury label.

Dion And The Belmonts - A Teenager In Love

"A Teenager in Love" is a song written by Doc Pomus and partner Mort Shuman It was originally recorded by Dion and the Belmonts, and was released in March 1959. It reached #5 on the Billboard pop charts.

B.B. King - Sweet Little Angel

"Black Angel Blues", also known as "Sweet Black Angel" or "Sweet Little Angel", is a blues standard that has been recorded by numerous blues and other artists. The song was first recorded in 1930 by Lucille Bogan. In 1956, B.B. King recorded "Sweet Little Angel" (RPM Records 468). According to King, "I got the idea for 'Sweet Little Angel' from Robert Nighthawk's 'Sweet Black Angel', though I later discovered that the song had been recorded by someone before Nighthawk. At the time 'black' was not a popular word, as it is now. Instead of using the old title, I changed it to 'Sweet Little Angel'—and that was a pretty big record for me".

The Platters - The Great Pretender

"The Great Pretender" is a popular song recorded by The Platters, with Tony Williams on lead vocals, and released as a single in November 1955. The words and music were written by Buck Ram,[1] the Platters' manager and producer who was a successful songwriter before moving into producing and management. The song reached No. 1 on Billboard's Top 100, and No. 5 on the UK charts.

Elvis Presley - Jailhouse Rock

Jailhouse Rock" is a song written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller that first became a hit for Elvis Presley. Presley performed it in the film of the same name and RCA Victor issued the song on a 45 rpm single on September 24, 1957, which reached the top of the charts in the U.S. and the Top 10 in several other countries. The song has been recognized by the Grammy Hall of Fame, the American Film Institute, and others.

Johnny B. Goode - Chuck Berry

"Johnny B. Goode" is a 1958 rock-and-roll song written and first recorded by Chuck Berry. The song was a major hit, peaking at number two on Billboard magazine's Hot R&B Sides chart and number eight on its Hot 100 chart.

Dave Brubeck - Take Five

"Take Five" is a jazz standard composed by saxophonist Paul Desmond and originally recorded by the Dave Brubeck Quartet for their album "Time Out", on July 1, 1959.

Eddie Cochran - Summertime

"Summertime Blues" is a song co-written and recorded by American rock and rockabilly artist Eddie Cochran. it was released in August 1958[1] and peaked at number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100 on September 29, 1958 and number 18 on the UK Singles Chart.

Top 10 Billboard Chart Topping Rock Songs of the 50s

The Coasters - Young Blood

"Young Blood" is a song written by Doc Pomus along with the songwriting team Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller that first became a hit in 1957. "Young Blood" was originally recorded by The Coasters and released as a single together with "Searchin'" in March 1957 by Atco Records. This song is compared to the cleaner cut song "Standing on the Corner" from the musical The Most Happy Fella. Their version can also be heard on The Very Best of the Coasters album. It topped Billboard's R&B chart and reached #8 on the Billboard Hot 100. The Coasters' version is ranked #414 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

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